Posts Tagged ‘IT-Business parnership’

14th

Isn’t it ironic?

Companies look to IT to develop systems to improve the relationships with their customers.  Yet when it comes to building relationships with the rest of the business, IT often seems to be out in the cold.Buidling relationships 2

Developers build and enhance CRM systems so that companies can track every customer interaction.  The CRM system can know what products a customer has purchased and what offers he has been given.  It can be aware of how the customer prefers to interact and a bit about his decision-making process.  The system may know the customer’s marital status, number of children, and the college he attended.  It can detail every interaction the customer has had with the company.  And by coupling corporate information with external data, systems can be more predictive of customer behavior and buying patterns.

With all this, IT should be extremely knowledgeable about building relationships…right?  And of course, the CIO should be a master at it.

Read the rest of this entry »

17th

Have you ever noticed that many IT professionals seem to leap to a conclusion?jumping-frog

I once attended a training course on how to elicit business requirements using a facilitated discovery session to gather requirements.  By bringing all the stakeholders together to define the project, the shared information and decision-making process was to improve buy-in, reduce risk of scope creep, and increase the speed of delivery.

As the instructor briefed us on the method, she recommended that IT people not be included in the discovery sessions.  Having come up through the ranks of IT, I questioned the reasoning behind such a statement and asked the instructor at the first break.  She cited an example of a recent discovery session her company had facilitated to gather requirements for a large project at a client company.  In attendance at the discovery session were a number of stakeholders from throughout the company – including two IT developers who had been with the company for quite a while.  After the facilitator had laid out the ground rules for the discovery session, she began eliciting business requirements from the attendees.  As requirements were suggested, they were to be discussed and refined as necessary.  However, it happened that as soon as the first business requirement was mentioned, one of the developers said, “We can’t do that.” When the next requirement came up, the other developer remarked, “We’ve tried that before, and it doesn’t work.”  Read the rest of this entry »

10th

Do you have the courage required to be the IT leader your company needs?

A 2012 study by Ernst & Young (The DNA of the CIO) reports that many IT leaders find their roles hugely rewarding and enjoyable, but relatively few have broken out of their comfort Driver or Passengerzone to become true partners to the business and the executive team.  The study states that many CIOs are truly a C-level in title only and are not perceived to be at the same level as others in the C-suite.  For example, only 17% of the CIOs participating in the study were members of the executive team, and less than half were involved in strategic decision-making.  Further, there was a disconnect between the CIO and the rest of the C-suite as to the value of having the CIO involved in a strategic manner.  It appears that many of the C-suite beliefs about the CIO are rooted in a historical view of IT as solely a back office function – perhaps somewhat akin to facilities management.  IT is viewed as a cost-center.  As such, a primary focus is often to control the IT budget rather than to explore the additional value IT can bring the business. 

Changing the perception of business leaders is not an easy task.  It is a viewpoint that has developed over a number of years.  Many see IT as slow, unresponsive, reactive, costly, and resistant to change.  Further, they often seem to believe that IT is more focused on themselves than on the business.    Read the rest of this entry »

3rd

What is it about IT and control anyway?control2

Obviously there is a great need for controls around IT systems and information. We put controls in place to ensure privacy of our customers’ information and to secure our corporate data from our competitors. We use security and balancing controls to provide separation of duties in preventing fraud and error. We have change management controls to enhance the stability of our corporate systems. You could go on and on with such examples.

But does the need for such controls necessitate a complete command-and-control management approach within IT? Read the rest of this entry »

26th

“What can I do to help you be most successful?”  This is a question any effective leader should be asking his team on a regular basis.  After all, strengthening and helping each team member to do his best will ultimately bring the most success to the team and the business as a whole.Profit

What do you think might be the response if the CIO asked the CMO, “What can I do to help you be most successful?”  Perhaps some of the CMO’s thoughts might be: 

  • Help us to better understand our customers.  We need to have a firm grasp on the information we already have about our customers, and we need to associate that information where possible with data from external sources to give us the most complete picture.  Help us to quickly add new sources of external data as we discover and obtain them. 
  • Provide a total picture of each customer to all employees involved with customer interaction.  Eliminate any information silos that currently segregate customers by product.  Update this ‘customer database’ in real-time with each customer interaction regardless of channel.

Read the rest of this entry »

Subscribe

Name
Email Address*
 
Newsletter Powered By : XYZScripts.com